Episode 7: We Can't Live Without Our Lives

15–19 Apr 2015
Tramway, Glasgow
Performance

It's Sorta Like a Big Hug

Park McArthur & Constantina Zavitsanos
21:30–22:45 Fri 17 Apr
Tramway
 / Glasgow

Access with £4 Friday Pass

BSL interpretation & live subtitling

  • A medium close up of the side and back of one person hugging and lifting another
    Park McArthur and Constantina Zavitsanos
    Park McArthur and Constantina Zavitsanos

About the event

A screening of the video It's Sorta Like a Big Hug with a live reading of texts and correspondence between Park and Tina, though which they imagine bodies not as an end in themselves, but as a medium through which we can become one another’s means.

Park and Tina are artists who work with sculpture, performance, text, and sound; they live and work within queer feminist crip1 communities in New York and beyond. They imagine bodies not as an end in themselves, but as a medium through which we can become one another’s means. They are members of Care Collective, a group of several people who coordinate Park’s care.

We are here living beyond our means. Some of us at the ends of what others may even mean by living, planning out our nights each day, episodically broken, stanza-ed but not standing corrected. We go deep into the daily in correctional facilities against the facility of correction we lay down wrong and easy, nice and rough. Strophic plot twists that render us things among love in this everyday performance against architecture, this performance everyday of anarchitecture. Here we double down, our division only multiplying the favour for each other we feel through each other through every other feel, communizing even the liens of reproduction in our daily care, or how we get around, a risk, a gamble, a sure thing that doesn’t wait to be corrected. Is it boring to plan? Park McArthur & Constantina Zavitsanos

In the spirit of being in open rehearsal together - practicing and doing, testing out and refining - the ways of being together proposed for this event were recently rehearsed at the New Museum in New York. 

 

  • 1. Just as Queer Culture reveals the fallacy of compulsory heterosexuality, sex and gender binaries, Crip Culture similarly exposes the lie underpinning society’s compulsory able-bodiedness.